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Mosquito

Tdevices were prepared before testing following the procedure in the Engeenuity device handling instructions. Twenty grams of micro-organisms and nutrients (Rid-X) were added to the buckets being tested.

Tdevices were prepared before testing following the procedure in the Engeenuity device handling instructions. Twenty grams of micro-organisms and nutrients (Rid-X) were added to the buckets being tested.

The devices were then used to treat a series of buckets at different time intervals, and three control buckets without treatment were also set up. Also, a series of buckets were not treated directly with a device. These buckets were treated with water that was in contact with the devices first. The buckets were then placed outside 15 feet apart from each other, and allowed to sit open in hopes of attracting mosquitoes to lay eggs. The buckets were monitored, and the treated buckets were compared to the control buckets. A detailed description of the setup is attached.wo devices were delivered to HML by Victor De Franco Levi on May 4, 2010. The two

Results
See attached tables for mosquito populations. Growth and morphology of the bacteria present did not appear to be different between the control buckets and the treated buckets. When comparing the larvae present in the control buckets and treated buckets, there did not appear to be any differences in morphology of the larvae, thus the devices and treated water did not change the way the mosquitoes appeared and grew.

Notes
During the duration of the test, the area had below average rain nearing drought conditions. Thus, a majority of the water present in the buckets during the test was the water added at the start and not diluted by rain water. Also, warm and mild weather lasted well into the test allowing more time to observe the larvae.

Conclusion
Based on the tests, it appears that the devices and water that was treated reduced the likelihood of mosquito eggs hatching larvae based on the control bucket having a higher population of larvae present. During observation of each bucket, the treated buckets populations never approached those of the control. Furthermore, the treated buckets seemed to limit the lifespan of the hatched larvae. Treated buckets contained a higher amount of dead larvae than the control bucket; this could indicate the mosquitoes were able to reach maturity in the control bucket and fly away while those in the treated died before reaching maturity. Also, though there was an initial spike of mosquito larvae in the treated buckets, across the time frame of the tests the larvae numbers were not maintained as in the control buckets Algae growth was also limited in the treated buckets. The control bucket had abundant growth of algae, and the treated buckets had little or no algae growth.

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